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NUJ Scottish Office website


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Brand Me – Confidence-building course for women in the media

The working life of a woman in the media can be precarious.  Many are on zero hours contracts, casual workers, freelance, part-time or on fixed term contracts.  So they have to continuously sell themselves and their skills, to get work, to survive.

Work is often allocated on a “who you know” basis, in other words “jobs for the boys” who meet up on the golf course, the football terraces or the pub.  Macho environments still prevail in some newsrooms and women’s voices are drowned out as the men are louder.

Additionally, women are known for not blowing their own trumpet enough.  They tend to undersell themselves, seeing the negatives rather than the positives.

That’s why they need help to up their game in the confidence stakes from someone who knows the industry from the inside. Continue reading

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The life of a precarious worker, by freelance journalist Claire Sawers


Freelance journalist Claire Sawers spoke about her experiences as a freelancer at the recent Stronger Voice for Women in the Media event in Glasgow last month.  Advantages include getting to choose your colleagues and avoiding the moaners!  Here is what she said.

We’re all working in conditions where it’s now more and more common to have a zero hours contract, to work precariously, in the unstable gig culture, with no guarantees, no safety net of a pension, sick pay, benefits or HR support. Continue reading


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A Stronger Voice for Women in the Media

Nevertheless, she persisted

It’s almost 50 years since equality laws were introduced and yet women are still fighting to be heard in the newsroom and in the news.

Women in senior editorial roles are very much in the minority.  Diversity in the newsroom is sadly lacking.  And this reflects in the news agenda, determined by men – often, white middle-aged men (although we shouldn’t use stereotypes).

Women are still judged on appearance and as they get older, they are often unseen and unheard.  The invisible woman is a common complaint, both in terms of recognition of their years of experience and their achievements as a journalist. Continue reading